The railway children

Usborne Young Reading


National Curriculum: 3a, 3b, 3c

Alan Marks, E Nesbit, Susanna Davidson

No. of pages 24

Reviews
This is an evocative picture book based on the classic E. Nesbit tale. When their father disappears, Bobbie, Peter and Phyllis move out of London and experience new exciting adventures in the countryside. But will their father ever return? It features illustrations taken from the popular "Young Reading" series.

 

This book contains the following story:

The Railway Children
Bobby, Peter and Phyllis live in a lovely house in a posh bit of London. Then one day their father is taken away to prison uner suspicion of treason. The children are not told why. The house is sold, the servants dispersed and with their mother the children go to live in a tiny cottage in the country. Every day the children go down to the railway line and wave at the passing train, and every day an old gentleman waves back. Bobby decides they should write to the gentleman on the train and ask him to help get their father back. Time passes but nothing seems to happen, until one day father returns. And the children learn that it was the gentleman from the train that had helped secure his release.

This book is in the following series:

Usborne Young Reading
The Usborne Reading Programme is a collection of over 300 reading books, graded in seven levels and covering a wide range of subjects, both fiction and non-fiction. First Reading covers the first four levels, and Young Reading the next three.Series 1: These titles are for children who have just started reading on their own. They are 48 pages long and typically contain several short stories or one longer story divided into chapters. They use fairly short, simple sentences and everyday vocabulary.Series 2: These titles are for children who are reading more confidently. They are 64 pages long and use varied sentence lengths, more complex sentence structure and more challenging vocabulary.Series 3: These titles are for fully confident readers who still need to gain the stamina needed for standard length books. They use advanced sentence structure and vocabulary and have more complex plots with subplots.

No reviews yet